Street food.

No, not food that’s somehow found it’s way onto the floor on the street. No, this is a post about Thai street food. Or more specifically, Bangkok street food. Two words: it’s AWESOME. Oh yes, it’s so good it deserves capital letters.

Street food is, not surprisingly, food from stalls on the street. There’s so many different types to choose from. Fruit carts, meat skewers, fish skewers, noodle soup, meatballs, noodles, rice, vegetables. Full plated meals, snacks or take away. Spicy or not spicy. SO MUCH CHOICE. Anywhere you go, there’s something available. And pretty much everything I have tried is so frickin’ DELICIOUS. Spicy, full of flavour and just so god damn tasty. Just sat here writing about it is making me hungry and wanting to go out and eat, eat and eat again.

And the people who run the carts and cook the street food are so awesome too. Happy, smiley, friendly people. Most of them seem to enjoy what they do and are happy to have a laugh and a joke, and love it when you love their food.

Yesterday was an epic street food day. Nick’s been rating his food, and his curry from a little stand near Khao San road has rated the highest yet. And the little guy who served us was an awesome happy little chappy, but the lady who cooked our tea at a little stand just down the road and round the corner from our hostel was the best yet. She was a little whirlwind of activity, joking and laughing with everyone as she went, cooking at a million miles an hour. We sat for ages just watching her. Especially when she was cooking a huge order for this Thai man, who had ordered a feast for two people. She put everything (including some soup) in little clear plastic bags for takeaway, and we ended up laughing and joking with him about how much he’d ordered and whether he’d be able to eat it all.

So, our street food day in pictures:

Brunch: Nick with his highly rated curry and the guy from the stall

 

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Dinner: my hot spicy vegetable/tofu stir fry thing and the happy smiley whirlwind lady

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The day ended with many beers, a ham and cheese toastie, crisps and chocolate from the 7 eleven but obviously that’s not really authentic Tahi street food so the less said about that the better…

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Catch up.

I’ve been a bit slack at blogging lately, I’ve been a bit too busy. I’ve not written about Mcleodganj yet, my favourite place in India so far, or even Manali where I spent a week. So, with a day in Delhi to be spent in my nice air conditioned hotel room I’ll try and do a brief catch up.

Manali was beautiful, all green forest-covered mountains with turquoise rivers. It felt a bit like an alpine scene (although I’ve never been to the Alps, so no idea whether this is right or not) and there was a very hippy vibe going on. Not that I’m in any way hippy but it was very relaxed. I ended up staying there a week, and in a way it was a bit like a holiday. I didn’t do much apart from eat, sleep, read, went on a few walks, a couple of runs and just generally chilled out. I didn’t really speak to that many people because I was feeling a bit anti social and in need of a bit of down time after a hectic few weeks (Donna, I nearly wrote quiet time but that’s not what I would have meant ;)).

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Wow it seems so long ago now, and I’ve realised there’s not a lot to write about. There might have been at the time, but not so much now. I ate a lot of porridge and Mars Bars, and read a lot of books.

Mcleodganj was my favourite place in India. I stayed here for about 5 days after the Introduction to Buddhism course.  I’m not sure why it was my favourite place, it’s very similar to Manali in some ways, but it had a different vibe. I loved the Tibetan feel of the place (it’s home to the Dalai Lama and many Tibetan people, monks and nuns), and it’s not quite so hippy. It was a place of many fabulous places to eat and chill out – I used to go to Cafe Budan every morning for banana honey porridge and to use the wifi. They also made the BEST lemon curd tart ever. I could have stayed much longer. I wonder if it was because I saw lots of people I ‘knew’ there (from the course) afterwards, so it was a little bit like being at home. Maybe it was because I made a great couple of friends there (Vicki and Anne) and we spent a fab few days together hiking and eating lots. Maybe it was because I found somewhere to stay only cost me about £1.28 a night which, although it wasn’t the most luxurious of places, was a great little sociable place with a hot shower and clean toilet, or the fact I found a flat running route at last. Or, the large amount of places to eat momos (a Tibetan speciality dish of dumplings). Or, it was a place where I did a lot of things, learnt a lot and felt a bit productive. Whatever it was, I loved it there and have many fond memories, and I was surprised at how sad I felt to leave. If I had longer in India, I probably would have stayed longer, and perhaps done some volunteering, as there are lots of opportunities to help out with different things. The only nice thing about leaving and coming back to Delhi is that everything didn’t feel damp any more. You see, it’s monsoon season in India, and it rained a fair bit in Mcleod. Most days, at some point, the heavens opened. Never for prolonged periods of time but when it rained, boy did it rain, and there was always a lot of damp in the air, so nothing felt dry. So, getting into bed, putting on clothes; all damp. I just got used to it after a while. Didn’t really have any other choice. And put it this way, I’d still rather be there and damp than in Delhi and hot and sticky.

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SONY DSCOh, and I got my nose pierced here. Not sure why, just fancied it. I also bought an anklet and some baggy trousers. Maybe I am turning into a hippy after all, haha.

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