Runs around the world #21

Tupholme, Lincolnshire, UK

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This is my final Run around the world. No, don’t worry, I’m not giving up running, it’s just the last run I will write about on this blog. So it seems fitting that it’s back in the UK, in the place where I grew up as a child.

Tupholme in Lincolnshire is so small it doesn’t have any place signs. So you really wouldn’t know it was here. Apart from Tupholme Abbey and Tupholme Hall all that’s here is a few houses dotted along the B1190, one of which is where my parents live, and which is one of the places I’m squatting at until I get my own place again. I’ve been pretty lucky with the weather since I’ve been back and there’s been a few glorious mornings so I’ve taken the opportunity to have a little trot out. There’s a nice 5K loop from the house that takes in my old childhood stomping ground. Apart from a little bit of main road, the rest of the route is on country lanes or bridleways, where I spent many hours riding my bike, playing with friends or riding horses. It takes me past the ruins of Tupholme Abbey, of which there’s only one wall left, but in the olden days was a huge monastery. It was also the site of the huge Tupholme Pop festival in 1972 where the Beach Boys and Rod Stewart played.

Being away for a year has made me realise just how beautiful it is around here, and how lucky I was to have grown up in such amazing surroundings, and I’m really pleased I’ve got the time and opportunity to run around here right now. Well, I make as well make the most of the weather and unemployment right?

And yes, it’s been great to get back into a bit more of a running routine, to run more than once a week. It feels AMAZING. I’ve done a lot of my catching up now, and so time for a bit of exercise, fitness, fresh air, good food and no alcohol.

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So, thank you for reading about my runs around the world over the last 18 months or so. Some have been really tough, some have been easy and some have been out of this world. I’ve run by myself, I’ve run with other people and I’ve run with animals. I’ve run in the most amazing scenery. I’ve ran in the dark, in the snow and in the hot, humid heat. I’ve ran up and down hills, and on the flat. In parks, along roads and by rivers. In altitude and in rain.

And you know what? They’ve been incredible. Every. Single. One. In their own way. Whether it’s been tough, hard work or great it’s still been a run. I’ve still got out there, got some fresh air and explored. Most of the time I’ve not known where I’m going, where I was going to end up or whether I’d actually make it round. Yes, I’m not as fit as I was when I went travelling, but I didn’t stop completely. Well, I couldn’t. Running is as much a part of me now as everything else. I’m proud of myself, even though I didn’t do it as much as I thought I would. I didn’t quit, that’s the main thing.

So here’s to many more runs, wherever they might be. And one thing’s for sure, my runners will always be coming on travels with me in the future. It’s still one of the best ways to explore.

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Runs around the world #20

San Francisco, USA

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Where I’m staying in San Francisco is really close to The Golden Gate Park. As I’ve found everywhere, parks are [mostly] a runners heaven, and tend to be full of people doing all kinds of fitness-ey things. This one was no different; lots of walkers, runners, cyclists. OK, so there were also a lot of homeless people and people sat smoking weed, but this is San Francisco, where that seems to be normal pretty much all over.

If you know anything about San Francisco, it’s probably that it’s hilly. Now, when back in the UK, I didn’t mind hills really. I’d got used to running up them. I used to run home, which was up the top of a hill. I used to do hill sprints up Steep Hill in Lincoln (not easy, but I used to do them). I’m not as fit as I was, I’ve mentioned that before. I’ve not done as much running, and although I climbed a fair few mountains in New Zealand, it doesn’t mean they were easy (or that I enjoyed them). And I certainly didn’t run up any mountains in NZ (although I did run down one). Luckily for this temporarily lazy runner, the park is pretty flat.

So, I did a lovely little round route of 4 miles. From where I was staying, I ran down the hill (oh yes, I’m staying on a hill) to the park, through and round a bit of the park, then back up the hill. I hadn’t actually planned on running back up the hill, but I was nearly at 4 miles and I needed to get to a round figure on my runkeeper stats. I’m sure most runners can identify with this slight OCD-ness.

The famous San Francisco fog was around this particular morning, but there was also a bit of sunshine. But not too hot. Perfect for running really. I’d not run for probably about a week, and I’d been a bit lazy in Auckland and dipped out of going for a run with Ross one morning, and so really had to force myself to go here, but once I’d got going I remembered why I loved running. It felt great and I just enjoyed the pure beauty of running in a new place, not really knowing where I was going, just enjoying the new views and surroundings.

Whenever I run in a place with a lot of other people, especially people going the other way, I always feel tempted to high five them. I thought about it a lot on this run. I was in America after all, surely out of all the places I’ve been, this is the place for it? But, I chickened out, despite feeling mildly hyper/giddy/hysterical (it’s those endorphins you know) as everyone coming the other way just looked SUPER serious. Still should have just done it. I did chat to a bloke who offered to take my picture when he saw me taking a selfie after I’d finished. He then told me about some more trails up in the hills where there was poison oak. Not sure there was the need to lift his shorts up to show me where it had got him, but hey, this is San Francisco. Everything and anything goes.

I’m still surprised I can run 4 miles. I feel like I’ve hardly run at all over the last few months, so I’m glad there’s still something left in there. I feel really quite unfit so it’s always a nice feeling to have churned out just over 4 miles quite easily (including ending a run on a bloody steep hill). As I come to the end of my trip, I CANNOT wait to ramp it up now. I’m chomping at the bit. I do need to sort out my damaged shoulder though, but hey, I can still run, and that’s enough for now.

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Runs around the world #16

parkrun, Melbourne, Australia

I wouldn’t normally post about two runs around the world in the same city but this one deserves a post of it’s own. This is a special post. My very first parkrun. Ever heard of parkrun? It’s a free, weekly, 5km timed run that are held around the world and are open to everyone.

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They take place in parkland surroundings and people of every ability are encouraged to take part; from those taking their first steps in running to Olympians; from juniors to those with more experience; everyone is welcome. I’d been waiting for one in Lincoln for ages (it had been in the pipeline for a while) as they are such a good idea, but by the time I left the UK in May there still wasn’t one in Lincoln (there is now though, whoop!), and I’d not been anywhere on a Saturday where one was held to try somewhere else. So, I made a promise to myself that I would do the Albert Park parkrun in Melbourne when I got here. And so I did!

So, the second Saturday after I arrived (I was busy cherry-picking the first Saturday) I set my alarm stupidly early (although Albert Park is not that far away from where I’m staying it’s a bit of a trek to get to – walk, train then tram) and headed for Albert Park, a big lake near the CBD in Melbourne, surrounded by lot of lovely green stuff. I’d already been tweeting with one of the race directors so was great to put a face to a name and have a chat before the race.

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The actual run was bloody hard work. A fast 5km after months of slow short runs was bound to be hard. And also add in the fact I’d done a 45km bike ride the day before. The lake seemed to go on forever and when I thought we were at about 3/4 of the way round I realised it was still less than half. Gah! But, I soldiered on, despite my legs pretty much screaming at me, and ran all the way round for a time of around 26 minutes. I would have been happy just to get round in under 30 mins so I was pretty chuffed with that. It’s only about 3 minutes off my 5K PB so with a little bit of work I could be back up there, although, I’m not that bothered about PB’s and times these days. I’m all about the distance.

It’s a beautiful setting for a run. All the way around the edge of Albert Park lake, passing swans, palm trees and rowing clubs, with the skyscrapers of the city in the background.

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There’s a great atmosphere; as with any running community, everyone is so very friendly and happy. On that first run there was a couple who regularly go who were getting married that day. So them, and their whole wedding party turned up to do parkrun. On their wedding day. Commitment or what. The organisers had arranged a veil, tutu, flowers and bubbles to celebrate. See? Running community = awesome.

I managed to chat to a few people, although they were mainly English – there’s a lot of us out here! It was either people just on holiday like me, or people who had emigrated. But, great to meet loads of different, interesting people. I love how running is so inclusive for everyone, and especially parkrun where you see athletes running alongside kids, running clubs alongside pushchairs and everyone in between. You’ve immediately got something in common with all those people there. It was a great experience for me to join in with something I love on the other side of the world. It really is universal.

Love it.

Runs around the world #13

Nong Khiaw, Laos

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Today’s run was in Laos, which is possibly the most laid back country I have been to. This maybe explains why I’ve been here about a week and a half now and this is my first run here. It’s a place that when you arrive, you instantly chill out. I’m not sure exactly why; I can’t quite choose one thing, or put my finger on it. It’s just one of those feelings.

I arrived in Laos by a two day slowboat trip down the Mekong River. Clearly no chance for running on those two days. I had no choice but to sit back, put my feet up and enjoy the ride. Arriving in Luang Prabang, we spent nearly a week there but I just couldn’t bring myself to be bothered to run. We walked and cycled lots, so it’s not like I wasn’t active. And I even saw other people jogging. But, I just didn’t fancy it most of the time. Only two times did I think about it; the first day I decided to go for food instead, and the other day it was heavy rain ALL day. Now I don’t mind running in the rain but this was monsoon-type downpours so there was no chance I was getting out in that. Luang Prabang was one of those places where you couldn’t walk fast; no one hurried, everything was at a leisurely pace. Everyone just loped around slowly with big fat smiles on their faces and nothing more pressing to do than wander around temples, climb Phousi Hill to see the town from up above or just saunter from restaurant to restaurant sampling all the different food. Pretty much every person that goes there that we either spoke to or read about ended up extending their stay but at least a day or so, if not longer.

Eventually, we managed to tear ourselves away from LP (as it’s affectionately known) and hopped on a very bouncy local minibus to get to a place called Nong Khiaw, about 2 1/2 hours north of Luang Prabang. It’s a small, dusty town that’s a bit off the beaten track, and is (according to my Rough Guide) smack bang in the middle of some of the most dramatic scenery in the whole of Indochina. They weren’t wrong. Every corner, everywhere you look, each side of the bridge and far into the distance there’s another stunning view. Another mountain, a river, a quaint village or a cliff face. Let’s face it, Laos is truly stunning. Every morning when I get up and look out the window I’m reminded and blown away by just how beautiful it is. So, I was determined to run here. Plus, the roads were fairly flat and the temperature is a bit cooler than the other places I’ve come to, which would be a first for months, and something I’d very much welcome.

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My first plan to run was scuppered by managing to either get a bug or food poisoning. Whichever one it was meant I felt a bit crappy for a couple of days, and although I managed to get out and about for a few walks, I had very little energy as I’d eaten no food and so [probably sensibly] decided a run wouldn’t be the best idea. So, feeling a bit better, this morning was the morning. Before I had chance to wake up properly, I jumped (not literally but I like the idea) out of bed and into my running gear (sadly not with any help from an automatic Wallace-and-Gromit style machine – although that would be good).

First thought? Oooh, it’s cool. Temperature wise. This is a big change. For all the time I’ve been travelling I’ve been running in really hot and often extremely humid temperatures. Here, it’s a bit cooler in the mornings and at night, and so this would be a different run. I maybe don’t have to say how pleased I was at this, as you might have already guessed that although I don’t like being cold, I don’t like being too hot with high humidity more. So this was like a breath of fresh air literally. Because the first thing I noticed was that my lungs hurt. You know, that kind of first-run-in-England-when-the-weather-starts-to-turn kind of cold. Hurts your lungs until to get used to it, or after you’ve run in the cold a few times. I didn’t think it was that cold (it was probably in the low 20’s) but it just shows how my body has got used to the different temperatures.

Second thought? Shit, I have no energy. I’m not really surprised, seeing as though the only things I’ve eaten in two days is an white bread egg baguette and half a can of Pepsi, which pretty much came back up a short while later.

Third thought? Get a grip, get on with it and just do a couple of miles.

So I did. And it wasn’t too bad. It was hard work, yes, my legs were weary, my lungs hurt, but I got into a rhythm, enjoyed some tunes, gazed at the mist covered mountains, chuckled to myself at the odd looks I was getting from the Lao schoolkids going to school, avoided the chickens that constantly run across the roads here, waved at the little kids peeking out the doors of the houses lining the main road and smashed a [slightly pathetic] two miles out. Only two miles, but it’s better than nothing. It was a faster two miles than I’d done in months, which hopefully proves I’m slower in the heat/humidity and not just horrifically unfit. And I can’t forget I’m still a bit ill. I know I’m not 100% yet. So I felt better for going, and am looking forward to my next run. It won’t be here in Nong Khiaw, because we’re moving on tomorrow. We’re only in Laos for a few more days, so I’m probably not going to be able to run again in this beautiful country I feel humbled to be visiting, however once is once enough to have it forever in my memory.

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Runs around the world #11

Bangkok, Thailand

First things first. Bangkok isn’t any less hot and humid than Hong Kong. Ok, well, maybe a teeny tiny bit. But not much. Second, night time temperatures are not that much different to day time ones. Which means any run is going to be on the warm side. But, well, I’m used to it now. Aren’t I?

Either way, I haven’t got a choice. If I want to run, I have to run. After a quick internet search and conversations with a few people, I’d been pointed towards Lumphini Park as a good place to run in Bangkok. A park with large open spaces and paths around the outside totalling 2.5km, it was an obvious choice for either a morning or evening run. I chose evening. I’ve mainly been running in the morning so wanted to mix it up a bit, and decided to go at about 7pm. Technically I figured it might be at least one or two degrees cooler. So, I hopped on the sky train and hopped off at the park.

There’s some kind of protest going on there at the moment although I’m not sure exactly what it’s about as all the banners and speeches and things are all in Thai. Something about justice though. I weaved my way through all the people gathered at the main gates listening to some speeches and music on a big stage and started my run, alongside other joggers. Following the path round the outside of the park, the first thing I noticed was that it was flat. No hills here. This was welcome.

I didn’t have a set distance in mind, but wanted to do at least 4 miles. I knew I could still run 6 miles after Hong Kong, so knocking out a 10K was probably an unconscious goal. I kept to a nice and steady pace, which back in the UK I’d consider slow, and actually would have struggled to run at (around 10 mins/mile). It still frustrates me that I’m running so slow, but, I know that it’s because it’s hot and I’m not as fit as I was. Dammit. And I still overtook some people, so I guess I’m not that slow.

As runs go, it was good. I managed to do 6 miles in total. The park was pretty at night, especially the reflections of the skyscrapers on the lake. There were many other joggers, including other westerners. I felt like part of a bit of an exclusive club. My legs generally felt good (although they started to get a bit tired at about 5 miles) and I guess I’d sum it up as a nice, easy jog with no major dramas. A very sweaty, nice easy jog. When humidity is high, it’s a bit like running in a steam room. The sweat just pours off. In some ways I quite like this; it feels like you’re actually doing something. Someone I know once said to me about running and exercise “if you’re not sweating with snot coming out your nose and feeling like you’re about to die then there’s no point in doing it”. And he’s got a point. And if you care what people think, then you’re screwed from the get go. The whole point of exercise is to get your body working. To push it. To keep going. Not to worry about what you look like or what other people think of you.

But, being sweaty doesn’t help your money stay in your pocket. At some point near the end when I pulled a wet, sweaty iphone out my arm holder to check my distance, I also pulled out the only money (a 100 baht note) I had on me. Unfortunately I didn’t notice, but luckily for me, a park ranger did, and cycled back after me to give it back. I could have kissed him; that was the only money I had to buy some much-needed water and food after my run. That water and the boiled egg off the man on the street never tasted so good.

I enjoyed that run so much I went back the next night to do it all over again. Only the next time I only ran 4.5 miles, and the boiled egg was replaced with the most amazing rice-chilli pork-fried egg combo street food. That meal, my friends, was one of the best meals I have had. Whether it’s because it was after a run or whether it was just mega tasty, I don’t know. And I don’t care.

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Runs around the world #10

Hong Kong Island, Hong Kong

This was my most favourite run so far. Yep. That’s right. It was fan-dabby-dozy. Bloody amazing. There are lots of reasons why. Probably the setting. Or the people. Or the weather. Maybe the view. Or the dark. Or the food and beer afterwards. Or maybe just ALL of those things.

This was my first accompanied run around the world. A few months ago I’d noticed that Nic Tinworth had started to follow me on Twitter, I think he had seen my articles on The Running Stories website. I’d noticed in Nic’s twitter bio he was from Hong Kong, so, knowing I’d be wanting to run when I got there I tweeted him asking for advice on where to run. A few tweets later and a bit of advice had turned into an offer to join him on a run when I got there. So, a few emails in Hong Kong led to arrangements to meet him and his girlfriend at the top of The Peak in Hong Kong at 8pm outside Starbucks. Following Nics directions I got the #1 green minibus to the top of the peak and waited, enjoying the view. Nic and Rachel turned up, having just RAN up to meet me. I started to feel a little bit worried; I hadn’t run since Beijing, they were both ultrarunners and now here they were already warmed up having ran up the peak. I wondered what I’d let myself in for!

But, Nic stayed true to his word and they went easy on me. For which I was very grateful. We had a slow, leisurely 10K run down the Hong Kong trail by headlamp, chatting away as we ran. Running through spiders webs, over tree branches and rocks, streams and mud, all just lit by the torches on our heads. I’ve never ran with a headlamp before; it was fun. Quite exciting and exhilarating. And  I managed not to fall over. The run was all mainly through woods, save for the odd break in the trees where I’d see a glimpse of the skyscrapers that make up that Hong Kong harbour skyline. Stunning. Atmospheric is probably the word I’d use. Imagine it. I think I actually got goosebumps as I was running in 30+ degree heat.

It was great to run with other people again too; not only was I meeting someone new and finding out all about them, I was running a route that I’d probably never had known to run had I just ran by myself. Even trying to find information on the internet wouldn’t have led me to do that route. One because I don’t have a headlamp, and two, because I wouldn’t have been able to direct myself as well as run. Especially at night. And it had to be at night, because it was so hot and humid in Hong Kong. It was bad enough running then, I’m not sure I could have ran any earlier.

My last run was 7 miles in Beijing but that was about 3 weeks prior, and so I was hoping my legs would hold out. I know I’ve lost fitness, that’s for definite, so I wasn’t sure what would happen. But they did me all right. Just. One section was very steep downhill, and I could feel muscles in my legs complaining towards the end of the run; muscles that hadn’t been used in that way before because I’ve never ran downwards that steep or for that long before.

But I didn’t really notice it that much, because I had too much of a grin on my face and a mega awesome feeling in my body from the endorphins swimming around to care. I just wanted to keep on going. Forever. Or for as long as my legs would keep going. Sensibly though we stopped at 10K. A nice round 6 miles on my Runkeeper app.

And what else to do afterwards but go for some thai food and a beer, where I got to know a bit more about Nic and Rachel and all their running achievements. And, wow, what an inspirational couple. They’ve certainly inspired me to try longer distance running when I can get back into a routine, and I’ve realised that maybe, just maybe I could do it. With the right preparation and attitude, maybe I could. So, that’s one of my goals for next year. When I stay in one place for long enough!

And damn, that beer tasted good. The running high I got was the best I’ve had for a while. That smile didn’t leave my face all night.

I can’t thank Nic and Rachel enough for taking me on that run, and giving me one of the best runs I’ve had in a long time. They are truly lovely people, and a real inspiration. Who knows, maybe I’ll be running an ultra with them in Hong Kong one day. Stranger things have happened.

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Runs around the world #7

Manali, Himachal Pradesh, India

So, my second run in India was in Manali, further up into the mountains in Himachal Pradesh. I’ve certainly not been running as much as I would like in India. But, in my defence, it’s been hard terrain everywhere so far. I know, I know, it’s a weak excuse, and perhaps you’re thinking I should have just got on with it. I do love running on all different surfaces and climates right? But really, it has been tough. Hot and so incredibly humid in Delhi, then foggy, hilly and full of people staring in Shimla. So what about Manali? Well, I’d already decided to run early in the morning to stop the stares, so that’s that issue taken care of (although there’s always a few people out who will stare; it’s inevitable). And the weather here in Manali has been much better than Shimla. No fog and not much rain. Nice and cool in the mornings, and then sunshine later on most days. So, should be good for running right? Well, yes. But.

Yep, you know there’s a but. Bloody hell is it hilly here. Well, it is in the middle of the mountains of course, I know that. The scenery here is just stunning, but hills make it hard to run, if that’s the only running you can do. Sure, hills are great as part of a training program, to be added in with long runs, flat runs and speed work. But hills all the time? Hard work, right? You bet. Because it’s not just little gradients. Lincolnshire people, they are like Steep Hill. First, imagine running up Steep Hill. Then, make Steep Hill about 3 times as long. So, run continuously up that. Then down. Then up again. Oh, and make it at 2000m altitude. Now, what do you reckon. Easy or hard, haha?

I’ve been here a week and will have done two runs. That doesn’t sound like a lot, and it isn’t. I’m disappointed in myself really. But, to be honest, I’m not quite sure where the days have gone, and why I haven’t run more. A couple of mornings I’ve enjoyed a lie in. I spent a couple of days on long, hilly scrambles walks up the mountains and so my legs were aching. I did yoga one morning instead. I do wish I’d done more running. But, you know what? I’m proud of what I have done. It’s no secret that hill running isn’t my favourite. So, getting to the top of the hill at the end of 3 miles, of which the latter half was uphill, lungs bursting and legs burning, was a great feeling, almost an achievement. Sure, it’s a short run, and sure, I’ve done hill sprints before but this was different. This was long, continuous steep gradients. A total elevation climb of 540ft. This was difficult and challenging and I did it!

I have to class this as one of my most scenic runs so far. Running past tree-covered mountains in the background and along the Beas River, the roar of the rapids in my ears.  Running through the Manali nature park, marvelling at it’s tall trees stretching as far as I could see to the sky, the rocks on the ground smattered with the morning sunshine. Running past people meditating and doing morning yoga, oblivious to my presence. Propelling myself up the hill, I glanced over my shoulder to see the mountains in the distance, hazy in the morning mist. I stopped to take a picture, all the while thinking, lucky me. Lucky, lucky me.

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Runs around the world #5

Mosi-o-Tunya National Park, Zambia

For a while this week I thought I wouldn’t be able to run while I was in Zambia because we’re in the middle of a National Park and as such, we’re not really allowed to walk (and therefore run) around on our own (only on lion walks really). It’s because of the animals. We’re not fenced in, so all kinds of animals are around (elephants, hippos, wilderbeest, zebra, baboons, monkeys, impalas etc.).

I was getting a bit distressed at the thought of not running for 4 weeks. What about my fitness? What about my muscles? I couldn’t bear the thought of it disappearing and having to start from scratch again. Especially as my next place is India (where it’s currently 39 degrees in New Delhi) where again I’m not sure about the possibility of running.

So, I don’t really have to say how bloody HAPPY I am that I’ve managed to run today. OK, so it is only in a lap, running around the White House (the main building here). I think some of the other guys were amused and thinking I was a bit of a weirdo. But still, it’s a run. Woohoo! And that’s all that matters. I only did 2.32 miles, shortest run for probably over a YEAR but it was so hot (it was at about 5pm, which, although it’s starting to cool down, the sun is still out and it’s probably still in the mid 20’s) and some of the lap is loose sand (aka Very Hard Work). I’ll do more. Probably only short runs like that though. But, I’ll try and add some speedwork in. And, it’s at least something. Really energised now. Hurrah for running!

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Runs around the world #3

Lincoln, Lincolnshire, UK

OK, so, again it’s still in England. And it’s a run that I’ve kind of done before. The Marine pointed out when we were in London that I shouldn’t include runs I’ve done before because I said I wasn’t going to, but I’ve decided to include this one because, well, I want to. It was a Glorious Run and deserves the write up, and I did run a bit that I hadn’t before.

Today’s run was 11 miles in total. Out from Lincoln along the River Witham to Five Mile Bridge and back again, with an extra bit stuck on at the end through and up the High Street. So quite a long run. I haven’t been for a weekend (yeah OK, I know it’s Friday but no work so feels like a weekend) morning run for what feels like AGES so I was well looking forward to this one. And it didn’t disappoint. Firstly, the SUN shone for a large majority of the time. This is Unusual. It was glorious to see the big yellow thing in the sky. It was so lovely and slightly warm that I took my long sleeved top off and ran most of the way in a T-SHIRT. Yes, that’s right people, A T-SHIRT. Such an amazing feeling.

It was the first run in a while where I wasn’t thinking “bloody hell it’s cold, can’t wait to get back”. I had my headphones in, running along in the sun. I enjoyed it. Running for the pure fun of it and enjoying every second, not once thinking about being pleased to stop or get back inside in the warm. Haven’t done that in a while.

I smiled, waved or chatted at people as I passed them. There were quite a few people out and about down the river path. Most people acknowledged me, apart from one runner and an older gent. Both occupied in their own worlds and thoughts. I got a runners wave from another runner. I contemplated making up a runners salute back but the moment had passed.

I had no idea what was down the river path. I still don’t know how far it goes. I know it at least goes to Bardney because there was a sign at Five Mile Bridge (funnily enough at 5 miles from Lincoln). From here it’s another 5 miles to Bardney. Which means it’s another 7 miles from that bridge to my parents house (although those last two miles won’t be along the river). So just over 12 miles from Lincoln to my folks house down that path. Really not that far. So in a few weeks I’m going to run to their house one day. Doubtful I’ll run back but that’s what my dad’s truck or my mum’s car is for.

All along the path are signs about the river and it’s uses in days gone by, benches to sit on and some arty sculpture things. There are two metal cows about 4 miles in. They’re quite pretty so I stopped to take a picture. I wonder how many people from Lincoln will ever know they are there, or, ever see them. I guess 4 miles is quite a way to walk, and there’s probably a lot of people that don’t even know that path exists. And of course, a huge majority that wouldn’t want to or couldn’t care less.

One of the things I love about Lincoln is that from pretty much anywhere in town, within just a few minutes you’re out in the countryside, with lots of green stuff to look at. Great balance.

Only one thing: I need new runners. These ones are battered, have ran too many miles and have no support. They are, to be frank, buggered. A job for this weekend I think.

photo 1 (6) photo 5 photo 3 (2) photo 2 (6)